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  * Vol 52 No. 1
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Volume 52 Number 1 2004
 

Editors, Editorial Board, Consulting Editors

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Research

Validity in Quantitative Content Analysis

Liam Rourke
Terry Anderson

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  Over the past 15 years, educational technologists have been dabbling with a research technique known as quantitative content analysis (QCA). Although it is characterized as a systematic and objective procedure for describing communication, readers find insufficient evidence of either quality in published reports. In this paper, it is argued that QCA should be conceived of as a form of testing and measurement. If this argument is successful, it becomes possible to frame many of the problems associated with QCA studies under the well-articulated rubric of test validity. Two sets of procedures for developing the validity of a QCA coding protocol are provided, (a) one for developing a protocol that is theoretically valid and (b) one for establishing its validity empirically. The paper is concerned specifically with the use of QCA to study educational applications of computer-mediated communication.  
 
 
 

Achievement Differences in Structured Versus Unstructured Instructional Geometry Programs

Robert D. Hannafin

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    This study investigated the effect of students' ability and type of instructional program, structured and unstructured, on easy and difficult posttest items. Seventh-grade students worked through 14 instructional activities in The Geometer Sketchpad, a dynamic geometry program, and accessed a Geometry tutorial developed to parallel the state geometry standards. Low-ability students scored higher in the less structured program, whereas high- and medium-ability learners performed better in the structured program. High- and medium-ability students outscored low-ability learners by a greater margin on the difficult items than on the easy items. Although their overall performance was poor in both programs, that low-ability learners performed relatively better in the less structured, less traditional, mathematics activities is an encouraging finding for mathematics educators and designers of open-ended learning environments.  
 
 
Development    
 

Shall We Dance? A Design Epistemology for Organizational Learning and Performance

Gordon Rowland

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Management experts claim that organizational learning, knowledge management, intellectual capital, and related concepts are more important to today's organizations than traditional assets such as natural resources and skilled labor. Management thus enters domains more typically studied by those in training, education, and human performance technology, and fundamental questions asked by philosophers are now asked by CEOs; for example, What is knowledge? and How do people learn? Cook and Brown (1999) responded with an attractive metaphor. They claimed that a "generative dance" of knowledge and knowing results in new knowledge and new knowing. However, they portrayed this dance as if it happens automatically. In this article, it is argued that human intentions play a major role, and that when intentions are added, the dance is accurately described as designing. Design, then, provides alternative answers to the fundamental questions about knowledge and learning, as well as different competencies for professional practice and different directions for enhancing organizational success. An attempt at such answers, competencies, and directions is made by linking literatures on learning and performance with design and by articulating what is essentially a design epistemology.

 
 
 
 

The Trouble with Learning Objects*

Patrick E. Parrish

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Object-oriented instructional design (OOID) offers the promise of universal access to online instructional materials, increased productivity among trainers and educators, and solutions for individualizing learning. However, it is unclear whether it can fulfill these promises to the degree many envision. As with every new instructional technology, it is easy to become overoptimistic about learning objects, but problems of education are always more complex than technology alone can solve. In this article, I take a critical look at the proposed benefits of learning objects described in the published literature, particularly scalability and adaptability. I also look at both the difficulties in defining the term learning object and the limitations of metaphors used to describe the concept, and concludes with propositions for learning object usage.

 
 
 
 

Student Feedback in the College Classroom: A Technology Solution

James L. Fitch

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Technology in the university classroom has made great strides in the area of presentation of materials. Ceiling-mounted projectors and media carts with projection capabilities have made the multimedia classroom presentation a routine event for much of the world of higher education. Now there is technology that permits the instructor to solicit student responses during class via wireless keypads. This allows all students to respond simultaneously and the instructor to know the results immediately. This article reports the results of a pilot study on student reaction to a specific system (LearnStar). Students were uniformly positive in their appraisal of this technology as a teaching tool.

 
 
 
Departments    

INTERNATIONAL REVIEW

 

 

The Impact of Instructional Technology (IT) Culture on Developing Countries

Abbas Johari

 
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Carriers, Dual Perceptions, and the Information Communication Revolution

Fathali M. Moghaddam, and Nadezhda M. Lebedeva

 
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The Impact of Instructional Technology Interventions on Asian Pedagogy

Heng-Yu Ku, Cheng-Chang Pan, Ming-Hsiu Tsai, Yedong Tao, and Richard A. Cornell

 
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The Residual Impact of Information Technology Exportation on Thai Higher Education

Michael Miller, Mei-Yan Lu, and Thapanee Thammetar

 
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Instructional and Information Technology in Papua New Guinea

Amy S.C. Leh and Richard Kennedy

 
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Web-Based Instruction in China: Cultural and Pedagogical Implications and Challenges

Doris Lee

 
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The Impact of Instructional Technology in Turkey

Cengiz Hakan Aydin and Marina Stock McIsaac

 
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RESEARCH ABSTRACTS

Eric Plotnick, Editor

 
   

Telecommunications Technology - Teaching with Technology: Use of Telecommunications Technology by Postsecondary Instructional Faculty and Staff in Fall 1998. Statistical Analysis Report. Edward C. Warburton, Xianglei Chen, and Ellen M. Bradburn. 2002. 84 pp.

Educator Competencies - Methods That Work: Educator Competencies for Technology in Public Schools. Miguel Guhlin, Leo Ornelas, and Richard Diem. 2002. 25 pp.

Affordances and Constraints of Technology - Emerging Patterns of Technology Affordances in Teacher Discourse. Alan L. Li. 2002. 35 pp.

Online Instruction - Designing Online Instruction: Analyzing the Process, Product, and Implementation. Arlene C. Borthwick, Constance L. Cassity, and Kate E. Zilla. 2002. 30 pp.

For Profit Internet - Searching for Educational Content in the For- Profit Internet: Case Study and Analysis. Bettina Fabos. 2002. 61 pp.

Computer Proficiency - Computer Proficiency: The Digital Generation Gap. Nina Kelty. 2002. 46 pp.

Technology in the Classroom - Changing Teachers' Perceptions and Use of Technology in the Classroom. Karen S. Ivers. 2002. 6 pp. 46 pp.

Technology-Enhanced Classroom Instruction - Online and Technology-Enhanced Classroom Instruction: A Comparative Study of Student Achievement. David Hyllegard, and David M. Burke. 2002. 33 pp.

Literacy Lessons - 'I Did Not Plan Ahead': Preservice Teachers' Concerns Integrating Print-Based Literacy Lessons with Computer Technology. Janet C. Richards. 2002. 22 pp.

Experiential Teacher Education - Multimedia Case-Based Support of Experiential Teacher Education: Critical Self Reflection and Dialogue in Multi-Cultural Contexts. David S. McCurry. 2002. 10 pp.

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Awards  
  Awards Program for Outstanding Achievement in Instructional Design download
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Call for Manuscripts download
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